Tumpty Tum

AnimalsThe painting began with stomping elephants, lions and tigers on the prowl.  Iris loved seeing the footprints in the paint and would look up at me pointing at each animal saying their name.  She was inventing new ways to include her toys, making marks, shapes creating textures on the paper.  Now and again I heard her say ‘tum, tum, tumpty tum,’ I thought at first it was to do with her trying to make elephant noises as she plodded his feet onto the paper but later on I realised what is was from.  She has a book with a cd and we have also got her the app called My first Classical Music Book, it was open on the page called ‘People’, the people in this book were the composers, Brahms, Beethoven, Handel, Bach, Mozart, Adams, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky.  There is a cartoon drawing of a composer trying to write a piece of music saying ‘Tum Tum, Tumpty Tum, Tiddly Pom…’ Iris was doing the same as she painted singing along working on her piece.  So I have named this one ‘Tumpty Tum’ it’s 55cm x 75cm, painted with watercolours and acrylics on watercolour paper. and a detail shot of the painting

Tumpty Tum

Detail of Tumpty Tum   Classical Music BookClassical Music Book Tumpty TumIf you are interested in a print of ‘Tumpty Tum’ please do email me, Arabella at irisgracepainting@yahoo.com We are offering free postage in July and here are the print prices 55cm x 75cm (same size as the original) – £127.00 ($217.93) 42cm x 56.5cm – £92.00 ($157.87) 33cm x 44.5cm – £57.00 ($97.81) 23cm x 31cm – £38.00 ($65.21) All of the profits raised from the sales of her prints go towards her ongoing therapies and some saved for her future.

Namazzi Blue

Namazzi Blue, 55cm x 75cm
Namazzi Blue

With springs in her feet she jumps, bounces and leaps for joy as she watches the rain, rivers, streams and fountains, intrigued by their movement and ever changing nature.  Impressions in her mind that later can be seen on paper.  A tremendous amount of tools and brushes lie before her, a collection that has slowly built over the last year.  Thoughtfully picking out a few, Iris experiments with rolling, stamping, smudging, dabbing and carefully sponging the paint creating a beautiful effect.  I am reminded of a rippling stream, you can almost hear it.

Kuendelea

Kuendelea, 55cm x 75cm

Kuendelea
Iris is listening to her favourite African music while she paints, making me laugh as I watch her body sway to the music.  Cloaked in blue cotton with little tassels on her cape dancing to the beat.  Her arms shoot out this way and that as she works quickly from one side of the paper to the other.  Then disaster strikes! Her cape drapes into the paint and spreads it’s mark across the paper.  Iris is in shock, standing perfectly still for a while as I make a plan to help her.  First by trying to get as much of it off her cape as possible, she points to the paper and I give her a hug telling her that it will be alright, we will sort it out.  She is miserable and I have to take her away into another room to calm her down and we leave the painting to dry.  Later when all is well again, the cape washed and dried, she returns to her painting and I fill with pride as I watch her try again.  This time she uses the sponges to create different effects on the paper and a beautiful image grows and evolves before my eyes.  A dramatic and incredibly expressive painting lies before her on the coffee table in the kitchen.  So here it is, Iris’s new Painting called ‘Kuendelea’ a Swahili name meaning growth and evolution.